Superconductors

Superconductors

Cuprate superconductors operate at higher temperatures than any other superconductors ever identified. Scientists hope to one day develop a room-temperature superconductor, harnessing insights about this unusual material.
University of Waterloo and Cornell University researchers Christopher McMahon, Haofei Wei, and Cissy Suen are studying a type of cuprate crystal as it transitions from its superconductive and non-superconductive state.

superconductor researcher

Cissy Suen on the REIXS beamline

suprate superconductor team

Christopher McMahon and Cissy Suen on REIXS. Cuprate superconductors operate at higher temperatures than any other superconductors ever identified. Scientists hope to one day develop a room-temperature superconductor, harnessing insights about this unusual material.

waterloo cornell superconductor researchers cuprate

Haofei Wei, a PhD candidate from Cornell University, Christopher McMahon, a PhD candidate University of Waterloo, and McMaster University undergraduate student Cissy Suen on the REIXS beamline. “Using resonant X-ray scattering and X-Rray absorption spectroscopy we can probe the behaviour of an underdoped cuprate crystal as it undergoes a phase change from a superconductive to a non-superconductive. These changes can be seen in the form of magnetic, charge, orbital and structural ordering phenomena. In particular, we look at transitional symmetry breaking, which are known as charge density waves. By understanding the intricacies of superconductivity, we can unlock many exciting technological opportunities.”

REIXS superconductors cissy suen

Cissy Suen working with the REIXS detector. “By understanding the intricacies of superconductivity, we can unlock many exciting technological opportunities,” says Suen.